Frequently Asked Questions:

Dogs & Cats - General


We are not veterinarians. All of this knowledge is based on personal experience as animal rescuers, volunteers, and lovers of furry folk.


  1. Where can I go to declaw my cat? She is destroying my furniture.
  2. I've heard all rescue animals are abused and will bite if you take them home. Is that true?
  3. I give my dog wormer pills I get from the grocery store. Isn't that for heartworms?
  4. I want to get my dog fixed, but I can't afford it.
  5. I don't want to spay/neuter. I want to breed my dog. What's wrong with that?
  6. Why do I have to have my pet fixed if I keep him inside or in y yard?
  7. I already have a dog. Why would I want another one?

  1. Q: Where can I go to declaw my cat? She is destroying my furniture?
    A: We could answer that question for you, but no one answers that question better than Amby. Please click Declawing Cats for an informative and thorough answer and then some!

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  2. Q: I've heard all rescue animals are abused and will bite if you take them home. Is that true?
    A: No. Yes, some animals have been abused. Some, not all. Yes, we have worked with them and hopefully eliminated fears. Some animals, abused or not, require an adjustment period when going to a new home. We expect all new families to be caring and understanding. If you let the pets adjust on their terms and don't force them to meet everything and everybody the first day, you and your pets will be happier. Aggressive animals are not available for adoption.

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  3. Q: I give my dog wormer pills I get from the grocery store. Isn't that for heartworms?
    A: That medicine is for the spaghetti-like worms you might or might not see in your pet's stool. Those are called roundworms. The preventative for heartworms must specifically say heartworm preventative and is obtained from veterinarians, not grocery stores. Some of the more common brands are Heartgard, Sentinel, and Interceptor. Heartworms live in dogs' hearts and are detected by blood tests. They are very dangerous and can kill your pet. If treatment is possible, which sometimes it isn't, it is very expensive and can also be life-threatening. The best treatment is prevention. You get heartworm preventative from your veterinarian. We're not vets, but as far as we know, they come in daily or once-a-month forms. On a personal note, the person writing this years ago lost a fabulous, beautiful red & white Siberian Husky to heartworm disease because her veterinarian told her her dog only needed preventative in the summer months. Our contracts require you to keep dogs on heartworm preventative. Please keep them covered year-round.

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  4. Q: I don't want to spay/neuter. I want to breed my dog. What's wrong with that?
    A: Oh, boy, do we have answers for you on that question! Please see the spay/neuter page because that answer deserves its own section. Do you mean besides the fact that we would rather have a life other than taking care of homeless animals? Mentioning breeding to someone in animal rescue is asking for trouble. Most of us tirelessly preach about the millions of animals killed each year (or how about the 1.5 animals killed every second, and that's just those we know about) because their parents were bred or because their humans failed to spay/neuter. We spay/neuter before you adopt because, though you might be honest, the next person who adopts might not be and in a few months might be bringing us back a pregnant dog/cat. See Faith's story.

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  5. Q: I want to get my dog fixed, but I can't afford it.
    A: Some veterinarians in the area are less expensive than others. If you contact us, we would be more than happy to put you in touch with low-cost veterinarians or spay/neuter programs in your area.

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  6. Q: Why do I have to have my pet fixed if I keep him inside or in my yard?
    A: Please see the spay/neuter page for a more thorough answer, but a couple of things immediately come to mind. One is called "marking," another the stench of unneutered male cat urine. Sorry for the sarcasm. Millions of animals killed kind of clouds the mind, but have you ever seen a dog or cat running free? I wonder how many of their owners thought, "Mine never gets out."

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  7. Q: I already have a dog. Why would I want another one?
    A: Of course, we're biased, but we think two pets are much better than one. Pets enjoy company of their own kind just like people do. Plus, sometimes we humans want some time away from our loyal four-legged companions. Two pets can provide companionship for each other. They can be running partners, examples of behavior for each other (be it good or bad!), as well as other things. Sometimes a dog who won't take medicine will take it if he thinks another dog is going to take it from him. Siberian Huskies are pack animals, and are much happier when there is more than one in the family.

    See the other FAQ categories:
    Administrative
    Policies & Procedures
    Volunteering

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